Category: "Innovate"

Beyond the balance sheet

In its latest Global Human Capital Trends report, Deloitte charts the rise of the social enterprise, in which companies’ reputation for respecting and supporting stakeholders and the environment is key to bottom line success. Indeed, the consultancy notes that some 65% of CEOs in a recent survey rated “inclusive growth” as a top-three strategic concern, more than three times greater than the proportion citing “shareholder value”.

A data-driven revolution

For years experts have been saying that big data is changing the way we live, buy, produce and obviously how we work. In the latter field, we are witnessing a momentous transformation that is shaking the foundations of the corporate world. In a context where data is becoming the new “coal” of organisations, data experts, people who know how to collect and analyse data, are increasingly required professional figures.

Edtech moves up the learning curve

Education technology – or the use of information and communications technology to facilitate, enrich and in some cases replace traditional forms of learning – is a hot topic with educators and investors alike.
As massive open online courses (MOOC) continue to sprout up, in many cases attracting students who may not otherwise have the possibility to study, educators also debate the extent technology can be used to improve the learning experience and the best way to do that in the traditional classroom setting.

Apulia takes to the skies

Earlier this year, a “SW-4 Solo” helicopter produced by Italian aerospace group Leonardo successfully completed its first unmanned flight, taking off and landing at the Taranto-Grottaglie airport in the southern Italian region of Apulia after 45 minutes simulating a surveillance mission.

From Japan to Italy with a trip beyond the Alps

Many Italian companies have yet to understand the value of blockchain, since it is a complicated subject; we are at the beginning of a long path to see this new paradigm working its way into organisations. I mean, a company knows perfectly well what the Internet is and how to exploit it for business. This is not the case, however, for blockchain. There is no lack of interest, but this often stops at the fields of education and experimentation. In the Italian market we have few solutions currently in production.

The blockchain: a new business perspective

While cryptocurrencies are undergoing major downturns, frightening those who had approached them recently and probably scaring them away, I am motivated to share some thoughts. I recognise that you have to be a little reckless to invest in cryptocurrencies. There are those who approach them simply to get some short-lived returns and then there are those who, on the other hand, believe in them deeply; I am referring to the blockchain, because behind this concept there is something more than pure speculation. It’s something broader, which goes beyond just the context of technology.

From the past to the future and viceversa

The world of the blockchain is an extraordinary one because it projects you into the future, revolutionising the business models and reference points to which we have been accustomed, but before doing so, encouraging you to have a peek into the past. This is something that must be done, otherwise we cannot understand the potential of blockchain.

How to transform a messaging app into a profitable company: the LINE case study

Back in 2011, a violent earthquake and devastating tsunami ravaged the north-east coast of Japan, leaving communication lines in tatters.
It was a total blackout: there were no telephones and no messaging.
A few months later, an instant messaging service interrupted the silence. Its name? LINE, an app launched by leading South Korean company Naver.

Businesses beware! If you are not thinking laterally, you may be missing a trick

Some companies may be missing out on opportunities for growth by omitting to explore potential applications of their technology outside their core business areas. This is the stark warning given by professors Federico Frattini and Erwin Danneels in a recent article published in MITSloan Management Review.

Italy is generating Big Data: but who’s collecting it?

Every action, every web search, every movement and every economic transaction we make leaves a trace.
Like modern-day explorers, we move around the world and – without realising – spread clues and signs of who we are, what we like and what we do not. And the level of accuracy is second to none. How much do we spend on sushi a week? How many steps have we done today? Do we prefer wool or cotton? We’ve visited Paris twice in a month – are we considering moving there?